Most popular interview questions and answers in TestNG

 1Q: What is TestNG?

A: TestNG is a testing framework designed for Java programming language to simplify a broad range of testing needs, including unit, functional, and integration testing.

2Q: What are the key features of TestNG?
A: TestNG supports annotations, data-driven testing, parameterization, grouping, dependency testing, parallel testing, and multi-threaded testing.

3Q: What are the benefits of using TestNG?
A: TestNG provides a number of benefits, such as:

Easy grouping and prioritizing of test cases
Support for data-driven testing
Parallel execution of test cases
Ability to generate HTML test reports

4Q: What is a TestNG test case?
A: A TestNG test case is a Java class that contains test methods annotated with TestNG annotations such as @Test.

5Q: How do you run a TestNG test case?
A: TestNG test cases can be run using an IDE such as Eclipse or IntelliJ, or using the TestNG command-line tool.

6Q: What is the difference between @BeforeSuite and @BeforeTest annotations?
A: The @BeforeSuite annotation is used to run a setup method before any tests in a suite are run, while the @BeforeTest annotation is used to run a setup method before any tests in a specific test tag are run.

7Q: What is data-driven testing in TestNG?
A: Data-driven testing is a technique in TestNG that involves running the same test method with different sets of data.

8Q: How do you parameterize a TestNG test method?
A: TestNG allows for parameterization of test methods using the @Parameters annotation.

9Q: What is the difference between @DataProvider and @Factory annotations?
A: The @DataProvider annotation is used to supply data to a test method, while the @Factory annotation is used to create and supply multiple instances of a test class.

10Q: What is TestNG XML?
A: TestNG XML is an XML file used to configure TestNG tests, including test suites, test methods, and test data.

11Q: How do you generate TestNG HTML reports?
A: TestNG generates HTML reports by default, and these can be customized using the TestNG report template.

12Q: What is the use of TestNG annotations?
A: Annotations in TestNG help us to define the behavior of test methods, class, or suite. They provide a more structured approach to writing test scripts and help to make the test code more readable.

13Q: What is the difference between @BeforeSuite and @BeforeTest annotations?
A: @BeforeSuite and @BeforeTest annotations are executed before any test method is run. The difference between them is that @BeforeSuite runs once before all tests in a suite while @BeforeTest runs once before all tests in a <test> tag in the XML file.

14Q: What is Data Provider in TestNG?
A: Data Provider is a feature of TestNG that allows you to run the same test method multiple times with different sets of data. It is particularly useful for data-driven testing.

15Q: How can you implement dependency testing in TestNG?
A: In TestNG, we can implement dependency testing using the attribute 'dependsOnMethods' in the @Test annotation. It ensures that a test method is run only if all its dependent methods have passed.

16Q: What is the use of the TestNG.xml file?
A: TestNG.xml file is used to configure and customize the testing process. It allows us to define the test suite, test methods, test classes, and other configurations.

17Q: How can you run TestNG tests in parallel?
A: TestNG provides a feature to run tests in parallel by using the 'parallel' attribute in the <suite> tag of the TestNG.xml file. We can run tests in parallel by methods, classes, and suites.

18Q: What is the difference between TestNG and JUnit?
A: TestNG provides more features than JUnit, including parameterization, grouping, dependency testing, parallel testing, and multi-threaded testing. TestNG also supports annotations for more structured test code, while JUnit uses inheritance for the same.

19Q: What is the use of SoftAssert in TestNG?
A: SoftAssert is a feature of TestNG that allows us to continue running the test even if an assertion fails. It reports all the failures at the end of the test, making it easier to identify all the issues at once.

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